Browse by Title
Browse by Title
Browse by Subject
Ordering Information
Educational Streaming
Sign up for our educational newsletter
Contact Us
Questions? Don't hesitate to call us at 212.243.0600 x20 or send us an email.

Educational / Non-Theatrical Sales
HISTORY (U.S.)

t_16acres.jpg
16 Acres

The rebuilding of ground zero is the most architecturally, politically, and emotionally complex urban renewal project in recent American history. The struggle to develop these 16 acres has encompassed 11 years and over $20 billion.

t_1971.jpg
1971

On March 8, 1971, eight ordinary citizens broke into an FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania, took hundreds of secret files, and shared them with the public. In doing so, they uncovered the FBI's vast and illegal regime of spying and intimidation.

t_accidental_courtesy.jpg
Accidental Courtesy

Musician Daryl Davis has played all over the world, but it's what he does in his free time that sets him apart. In an effort to find out how anyone can 'hate me without knowing me,' Daryl likes to meet and befriend members of the Ku Klux Klan.


Altina

A woman ahead of her time, Altina Schinasi was born in 1907 in New York City; the daughter of a tobacco tycoon and descendent of Sephardic Jews. Her genteel upbringing was in sharp contrast to the bold sexuality of her art and her life.

t_americanreds_ed.jpg
American Reds

Weaving powerful and compelling personal stories told by American Communists with objective historical sources and analysis, American Reds: "What Must We Dream Of?" illuminates the epic story of the rise and fall of the American Communist Party.

t_reinholdniebuhr.jpg
American Conscience: The Reinhold Niebuhr Story, An

Reinhold Niebuhr's Serenity Prayer remains one of the most quoted writings in American literature. Yet Niebuhr's impact was far greater, as presidents and civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. often turned to his writings for guidance and inspiration.

t_anita2.jpg
Anita: Speaking Truth to Power

Directed by Academy Award-winning filmmaker Freida Mock, Anita: Speaking Truth to Power celebrates Anita Hill's legacy and reveals the story of a woman who has empowered millions to stand up for equality and justice.

t_stonewall_box.jpg
Before & After Stonewall

Two seminal documentaries tell the remarkable tale of how homosexuals, a heretofore hidden and despised group, became a vibrant and integral part of America.

t_braddock.jpg
Braddock America

A few miles outside of Pittsburgh, lies the town of Braddock, the last bastion of steel. Like many cities in the industrial heartland, Braddock has seen better days. But its community continues to come together as it tries try to reinvent itself in a postindustrial West.

t_brotherarms.jpg
Brothers in Arms

In the early months of 1969, six men met on a swift boat on the Mekong Delta during some of the worst fighting in the Vietnam War. Their commander happened to be a young Yale graduate named John Kerry.

t_castingby.jpg
Casting By

Tom Donahue combines archival material and interviews with Glenn Close, Jeff Bridges, Martin Scorsese and many more to tell the story of legendary casting director Marion Dougherty, and Hollywood's most unheralded profession.

t_everythreeseconds_temp.jpg
Every Three Seconds

Every three seconds someone in the world dies from factors related to extreme poverty - 30,000 people a day and 10.5 million a year. The sheer magnitude can be overwhelming, causing people to ask "What can one person do to make a difference?"

t_harperlee.jpg
Harper Lee: From Mockingbird to Watchman

In this update of her 2011 documentary, filmmaker Mary McDonagh Murphy sifts through the facts and speculation surrounding Lee and both her novels. Includes interviews with Lee's older sister, close friends and admirers, from Oprah Winfrey to Wally Lamb.

t_hottype.jpg
Hot Type: 150 Years of The Nation

Two-time Oscar winner Barbara Kopple takes a lively behind-the-scenes look at America's oldest continuously published weekly magazine, capturing the day-to-day challenges of publishing and illuminating how the past continuously shapes current events.

t_icanbepresident.jpg
I Can Be President

What would it be like to grow up and become president of the United States? In I Can Be President: A Kid's-Eye View, a diverse group of children candidly share their thoughts on the subject, affirming the importance of having dreams at any age.

t_idreamofwires.jpg
I Dream of Wires

I Dream of Wires tracks the rise, fall and rebirth of the machine that shaped electronic music: the modular synthesizer. The film explores the synthesizer's remarkable history and the resurgence of high end synthesizers being use by a new generation.

t_indianpoint_ed.jpg
Indian Point

Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant looms just 35 miles from Times Square. With over 50 million people living in close proximity to the aging facility, its continued operation has the support of the NRC, yet has stoked a great deal of controversy in the community.

t_jfk.jpg
JFK: The Private President

With reminiscences by Robert Kennedy Jr., Harry Belafonte, Ted Sorensen and Sergei Khrushchev, and rare footage from the private Kennedy archives, JFK: The Private President is an intimate view of life inside 'Camelot' with the legendary First Family.

t_lastseason.jpg
Last Season, The

Every September over 200 seasonal workers set up a camp near the town of Chemult, Oregon where they search for the rare matsutake mushroom. This probing documentary examines the bond between two of these hunters in one unusually hard season.

t_misshill_ed.jpg
Miss Hill: Making Dance Matter

Miss Hill: Making Dance Matter tells the inspiring and largely unknown story of Martha Hill, a woman whose life was defined by her love for dance, and who successfully fought against great odds to establish dance as a legitimate art form in America.

t_okinawa.jpg
Okinawa: The Afterburn

Released in Japan on the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Okinawa, Okinawa: The Afterburn is the first documentary to provide a comprehensive look at the battle and the ensuing 70-year occupation of Okinawa by the United States military.

t_ourman_ed.jpg
Our Man in Tehran

In this gripping documentary, the story of the "Canadian Caper" is told by the man who knows it best: Ken Taylor, Canada's former ambassador to Iran, who hid the six Americans and obtained the counterfeit documents that allowed them to escape Tehran.

t_populationboom.jpg
Population Boom

In Population Boom, acclaimed director Werner Boote traverses the globe to examine the myths and facts about overpopulation. Speaking with everyone from demographic researchers to environmental activists, Boote comes to a surprising conclusion.

t_chomdvd.jpg
Power and Terror: Noam Chomsky in our Times

Power and Terror presents the incisive and controversial thinking of one of the most articulate, committed and hard-working political dissidents of our time, MIT linguist and political philosopher Noam Chomsky.

t_professor_ed.jpg
Professor, The: Tai Chi's Journey West

The Professor tells the story of the remarkable life of one of Tai Chi's greatest masters, Cheng Man-Ching, a man who brought Tai Chi and Chinese culture to the West during the swinging, turbulent 60's.

t_drbaseball.jpg
Ron Taylor: Dr. Baseball

Ron Taylor: Dr. Baseball is the story of an 11-year Major League pitcher, who after winning two world championships, embarked on a USO tour through Vietnam that would change his life. After visiting field hospitals, Ron devoted the rest of his life to medicine.

t_sexed.jpg
Sex(ed)

Sex(ed) captures the humor, shock and vulnerability people face when learning about sex, through the lens of the often hilarious, only sometimes informative, sex-ed films from 1910 to the present day.

t_smiling_ed.jpg
Smiling Through the Apocalypse

Esquire magazine was a galvanizing force in American culture from the early 1960s through the early '70s. The chief architect of this print revolution was Harold Hayes, a brilliant editor who granted contributors unprecedented journalistic freedom.

t_stormmakers_ed.jpg
Storm Makers, The

Featuring brutally candid testimony, The Storm Makers is a chilling expose of Cambodia's human trafficking underworld and an eye-opening look at the complex cycle of poverty, despair and greed that fuels this modern slave trade.

t_throughalensdarkly.jpg
Through a Lens Darkly

The first documentary to explore the role of photography in shaping the identity of African Americans from slavery to the present, Through a Lens Darkly probes the recesses of American history by discovering images that have been suppressed, forgotten and lost.

t_triald.jpg
Trials of Henry Kissinger, The

Alex Gibney and Eugene Jarecki's The Trials of Henry Kissinger explores how a young boy who fled Nazi Germany grew up to become one of the most powerful and controversial figures in U.S. history.

t_leith_ed.jpg
Welcome to Leith

Welcome to Leith chronicles the attempted takeover of a small town in North Dakota by notorious white supremacist Craig Cobb. As his behavior becomes more threatening, tensions soar, and the residents desperately look for ways to expel their unwanted neighbor.

t_whenjusticeisntjust.jpg
When Justice Isn't Just

Directed by NAACP Image Award winner David Massey, this dynamic documentary features legal experts, local activists, and law enforcement officers delving into ongoing charges of inequality, unfair practices, and politicized manipulations of America's judicial system.

  After Stonewall- Narrated by Melissa Etheridge, this sequel to Before Stonewall chronicles the history of lesbian and gay life from the riots at Stonewall to the end of the millenium.

American Teacher- While research proves that teachers are the most important school factor in a child's success, American Teacher reveals the frustrations facing today's educators.

Arguing the World- For more than half a century, Irving Howe, Daniel Bell, Nathan Glazer and Irving Kristol have all passionately believed that ideas can change the world. And they have been fighting over those ideas ever since they entered New York's City College as young radicals in the 1930's.

Before Stonewall- When the police raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in Greenwich Village, three nights of rioting sparked a national gay liberation movement. This acclaimed documentary tells the dramatic story of gay and lesbian life from the 1920s up until Stonewall.

Behind the Burly Q- Burlesque and vaudeville were America's most popular form of live entertainment in the first half of the 20th century - until cinema drove them from the mainstream. By telling the intimate and surprising stories from its golden age, Behind the Burly Q reveals the story of burlesque, even as it experiences a new renaissance.

Berkeley in the 60’s- The Sixties come to life in this gripping film that captures the decade's events - the Free Speech Movement, Civil Rights marches, anti-war protests, Black Panthers - in all their immediacy and passion.

Blood in the Face- A jaw-dropping view of America's white supremacy movement. Rare archival footage, darkly humorous interviews, and their own promotional materials bring to light the inner workings of the Ku Klux Klan, the American Nazi Party, and other radical right groups.

Bright Leaves- Using the Hollywood melodrama "Bright Leaf" as a jumping off point, filmmaker Ross McElwee reaches back to his roots in this witty rumination on American History, tobacco, and the myth of cinema.

Champagne Safari- The true story of Charles Bedaux, wealthy businessman, glamorous playboy, daring adventurer, who hobnobbed with the rich, powerful and famous all over the globe - including Nazi Germany.

Commune- Black Bear Ranch was the prototypical 1960s commune, with the motto “Free Land for Free People.” This acclaimed documentary offers a candid look into the joys and difficulties of communal living.

Constantine’s Sword- This astonishing exploration of the dark side of Christianity follows former priest and National Book Award winner James Carroll on a journey of remembrance and reckoning.

Evergreen: The Road to Legalization- In 2012, Ballot Initiative 502 made Washington the first American state to legalize possession of recreational marijuana. Evergreen captures this historic time, providing a balanced view by going inside both proponent and opponent camps.

Far Out Isn't Far Enough Far Out Isn’t Far Enough chronicles renegade children’s book author and illustrator Tomi Ungerer's wild, lifelong adventure of testing society's boundaries through his subversive art.

Fire on the Mountain- The story of the 10th Mountain Division, America's only winter warfare fighting unit, who fought the Nazis on skis in the high mountains.

Hey, Boo- Hey, Boo: Harper Lee & To Kill a Mockingbird chronicles how the beloved novel came to be written, the context and history of the Deep South where it is set, and the social change it inspired after its publication.  The film also offers an unprecedented peek into the life of author Harper Lee.

Howard Zinn: You Can't be Neutral on a Moving Train- This film documents the life and times of the historian, activist and author of the best selling classic A People’s History of the United States. Featuring rare archival materials, interviews with Howard Zinn as well as colleagues and friends.

Intrepid Descent- Intrepid Descent captures the classic wilderness experience of skiing Tuckerman Ravine, the legendary - and dangerous - birthplace of backcountry skiing.

Man Nobody Knew, The- The Man Nobody Knew: In Search Of My Father, Cia Spymaster William Colby is at once a probing history of the CIA, a personal memoir of a family living in clandestine shadows, and an inquiry into the costs of a nation's most cloaked actions.

Moving Midway- Godfrey Cheshire's film about his family's Southern plantation - and the colossal feat of moving it to escape urban sprawl - is a thoughtful and witty look at how the racial legacy from the past continues into the present.

One Bright Shining Moment- When presidential candidate George McGovern took on Richard Nixon in 1972, he didn’t win- but in his bold, grassroots campaign, we find the genesis of today's progressive movement.

Paralyzing Fear: The Story of Polio in America, A- Seldom has society come full circle in the cycle of a disease - from illness, to epidemic, to cure. Polio is the 20th century's most notable exception. This fascinating story is told here using thousands of photographs and films along with interviews with polio survivors, their families, nurses, doctors, and community leaders, bringing to life an America that was both brave and innocent.

Perfect Candidate, A- Sometimes horrifying, often hilarious, this twisted journey into the underbelly of American politics offers an astonishing look at Oliver North's run for the U.S. Senate.

Prosecution of an American President, The- This electrifying film documents the efforts of Vincent Bugliosi, one of the nation's foremost prosecutors, as he presents his case that George W. Bush should be prosecuted for the deaths of American soldiers in Iraq.

Pruitt-Igoe Myth, The- This documentary tells the story of the transformation of the American city in the decades after World War II, through the lens of the infamous Pruitt-Igoe housing development and the St. Louis residents who called it home.

Ross McElwee Collection, The- Six films on five discs including four films never before released on DVD!: Charleen, Backyard, Sherman's March, Bright Leaves, Time Indefinite, Six O'Clock News.

Sacco and Vanzetti-Sacco and Vanzetti brings to life the story of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, two Italian immigrant anarchists who were accused of a murder in 1920, and executed in Boston in 1927 after a notoriously prejudiced trial.

Senator Obama Goes to Africa- Part personal odyssey and part chronicle of diplomacy in action, this timely documentary follows Barack Obama as he takes an emotional journey to Kisumu, Kenya - land of his ancestry.

Sex & Justice- Narrated by Gloria Steinem, Sex & Justice presents the highlights of the dramatic confrontation between Anita Hill and Clarence Thomas at his Supreme Court confirmation hearings before the United States Senate in 1991.

Sherman's March- Ross McElwee's autobiographical quest for true romance along the original route of General Sherman's Civil War March.

Soldiers of Paint- Soldiers of Paint follows a dramatic battle involving 5,000 people who re-stage the Invasion of Normandy, in Oklahoma. Instead of bullets they use paint and it's any man's game, which means the Germans could win! 

Vito- Directed by award-winner Jeffrey Schwarz, Vito paints a galvanizing portrait of Vito Russo, author of the seminal book The Celluloid Closet and an outspoken activist in the LGBT community’s struggle for equal rights.

We Were So Beloved- Between 1933 and 1941 thousands of Jews fled Nazi Germany and Austria for America. Leaving behind brothers, sisters and parents, more than 20,000 of them came together in Washington Heights in New York City.